Category Archives: Doily. Fractal Doily

How to fix a lining for a semi circular crochet/knitted purse

How to fix a lining for a semi-circular Crochet  Clutch


Usually when you are making a semi- circular clutch either in fabric, crochet, knitting or any other material…the easiest way to do this is by creating or cutting out a round shape of the size that you want your clutch to be and folding it, thus getting a semi -circle shape.

Please Note that this tutorial caters to both…those who are using a canvas within the lining to give shape to the Clutch and those who just want a fabric lining. While you must go through the entire tutorial….All notes in Blue are for those who are only doing the fabric lining.

Once you have worked your round shape in  crochet…into the size you wish…


the next step is to fix the lining. Now linings can help in two ways

  1. To give the clutch a definite shape in case the crocheted round is not stiff
    (if you have made it in acrylic or any other soft yarn, or have not used the Mochila method of carrying yarn thus giving strength and shape to your work)

       2. To make the inside of your clutch look aestheically appealing and neat. You don’t want to be grappling with loose thread ends etc…becos the inside of your clutch will be your wrong side.

Now that you have finished your crochet work…..Lay it open on the table…if you need to starch it to make the shape hold or more stiff…do so now(this is if you are doing the work in thread)…but you don’t have to if you you have worked with a studier fibre.

I was at an exhibition in Pune recently and while conversing with a very talented crafter learnt that in India many ppl line their bags with jute material. Not only does it come cheap…it is also has an ethnic charm all of it’s own. It is also sturdy and doesn’t allow the finished work to flop about).

It is time to do the lining work…..

1.  Fold the lining material in half. Place your crochet Round on the Lining material.  There should be a 2 cms  extra material around the crochet round. So that after you mark and cut the fabric you have 2 fabric rounds.

( Remember if you are using a fabric with patterns on it…it is important to fold the material in such a manner that the wrong sides are facing each other and that the right side, is facing you.

If you are not using a canvas material to give shape to the clutch,

There is no need to fold the fabric,

Mark another cirlce by pencil just 2 cms away from the first circle,

…. then cut out just one fabric round….

And sew around the hem to give it a neat appearance. You can either use a sewing machine or you can sew it in by hand using the running stitch.

2. Using a fabric chalk or a pencil….mark a circle exactly around the crochet round on the fabric.

3. Now mark another circle concentric to the first one, 1 cms away. And then the third and most outer concentric circle another 1 cms away. Thus you have now marked out 3 concentric circles. Like is seen below….


4. Now cut the fabric along the outer most circle. Keep aside.

5.Now if you have made the work in acrylic or any soft will need a sturdy piece of canvas….Place the crochet Round on the canvas and measure a cirlce 1.5 cms less than that of the crochet round. Cut along this circle.


(We make the canvas round slightly smaller because, the edge of the crohcet round will be needed to join the sides and also to attach the zip.

(The pics below are optional….. I have used a plastic table mat too along with the canvas becos my canvas isn’t stiff enough)


6. Place both fabric rounds right side together ..

Using either a sewing machine or by hand  (use running stitich) stitch together along the first concentric circle, around the  two rounds but only work 3/4ths of the way. You have now created a round fabric envelope.

Push in the round canvas and make it lie straight within the fabric envelope that you have created…Hand stitch the rest of the round together. Then stitch around outline of the canvas  in 2 circles slightly away form each other…This makes the canvas stay fit within the fabric envelope and is aestheticall appealing beocs the stitches will give the clutch a sharp edge when you fold it.

(The pics below are optional….. I have used a plastic table mat too along with the canvas becos my canvas isn’t stiff enough)


Once you have sewed the stiffening fabric(the canva) into the lining…fold it by half and pin it together all around the curve.

In the video below I explain the procedures to be followed –





Once you have pinned it sew inthe sides together to the length you think you need along the side. I have sewed in 10 cms on both sides, leaving the top portion open to fix the zip.

Here is another little video where how to fix the zip is explained….

Thus you have now done the lining for your clutch….

If you are not using a canvas you will fold and hem an edge around the fabric round,

Then, fold it and sew together both the sides.

you will sew in the zip as explained below

The next step is to fix the zip to the lining…

Place the zip across the top of the clutch.and fix the end of the zip, to the side of the fabric lining by sewing it in securely with a thick thread. Do not yet open the slider of the zip.

Once you have secured one end…..move the slider down the teeth of the zip so that you can place it on the excess fabric on either side of the mouth of the clutch.

Now sew in one side of the zip, say, the right side…when you reach the other side of the fabric lining move down until you reach to the closed edge. There you put both pieces of the zip together and sew it there securing the other end as well….


Then come back sewing along the left side securing the zip  to the fabric edge. Once you have fixed the zip. close the zip.


Fold you Crochet round in two… Join the sides on either side using single crochet.

Now push in the zippered lining into this crochet envelope that you have just created.

(Same procedure for those of you who re doing only the fabric lining)

Then, pull the crochet fabric tighly over the lining covering it completely except the zipper portion.



Using a thick thread sew and secure the crochet round to the lining fabric within.

Voila…you Stylish Crochet Clutch is ready!

The inside of your clutch….I haven’t yet hemmed in the excess fabric… when I am done it will be really neat….I will upload another pic in when I do….Right now I have to hurry to finish a CAL and make another liing tutorial without a canvas…just a fabric lining….with a zip.



Mochila Crochet – History

Mochila Crochet – History

(pic courtesy the internet)

Ever since I saw these intricately woven bags on the internet especially in crochet groups, I have been intrigued by them. Recently I took part in a CAL by Marion Verloop to learn ths technique. This tapestry technique is fascinating and so addictive that I lost no time in googling information about it.

History of the Mochila

The Wayuu is a  ethnic group of the Guajira Peninsula in northern Colombia and northwest Venezuela. The Wayuu people are a Matriarchal society and it is the women who weave the Mochila bags. Yes…it was first woven on looms and was a weaving technique.

Wayyu history says that their women were originally taught how to weave the bags and create the complex patterns that make up the design by the God  Wale Keru,who is symbolised by the Spider

Although the whole Arhuaco community is involved in production, only Wati (Arhuaco women) can weave the bags together according to custom. Traditionally, the women learn to weave from an early age by watching their mothers. When a girl first attains puberty she is kept isolated for 6 months or so. This is when she is taught to weave, to cook, to bring up children and all the chores that a woman must know.

The first mochila a woman makes is given to the priest for the rituals of the life cycle. A traditional Wayuu settlement is made up of five or six houses that made up caserios or rancherías. Each ranchería is named after a plant, animal or geographic place. A territory that contains many rancherias is named after the mother’s last name; that is, society is matrilineal. The Wayuu congregated in rancherias are usually isolated and far from each other to avoid mixing their goat herds.

Later as the Spanish conquered South America, the nuns introduced crochet to the Wayuu people, who ingeniously incorporated their magnificent heritage of Kanas(patterns) into creating these beautiful bags. Thus Mochila Crochet  was born.

Here while the woman make the bags it is the  Men who weave weave the straps…

Wayuu culture is known for crafts such as bags or mochilas. There are many styles of mochilas. A susu is a backpack typically 20cm-30cm wide and 35cm high, used to store personal and work items. Characteristic for the fabrics are the decorating patterns inspired by nature and what the culture sees around.

The colors with which the mochilas are woven are earth tones, ranging from brown and beige to black and gray. Normally a bag wil take from 20 days to 30 days to make.

Yarn used for the Mochila

Originally they were woven with natural fibers from the Arahuaco lands, such as agave and cotton. The Spanish introduced sheep’s wool and currently mochilas are made with cotton yarn  and industrial fibers.

You can also make the Mochila with cotton thread provided it is taken in double strength..that means 2 strands work as one. To make the normal  size you would probably have to double the number of rows as well.

How the Arahuaca People use the Mochila

Arhuaco men traditionally use three bags:

1. Chige Kwanu, to save personal belongings,

2. Zizhu, to carry cocoa leaves,

3. Another one for food storage or travel items.

They also used a fourth one called masi, to hold their poporo.

The women carry the tutu gawa made of agave. The tutu chakeai and jina kau (white, cotton, without drawings) are marunsama backpacks or mamu (spiritual sage of the arhuaco).

When a man and woman will marry, the future wife weaves two bags, one for her and one for her husband, to symbolize the love of the couple.

Meaning of Mochila

The Mochila Arhuaca, or tutu iku in Ika, is a popular Colombian artisan bag made by the Arhuaco people of the Sierra Nevada.

In Spanish it means A knapsack, Back pack, Haver sack or a Saddle Pouch,

Thus Mochila Arahuaca simply means a backpack of the Arahuaca people.

In the olden times, the Spanish who had invaded South America used these bags as saddle bags to carry the mail on ponies. It was a square leather saddle covering having openings for the horn and cantle and sometimes equipped with saddlebags. Many riders and even more ponies carried the mail, but only the mochila made the entire trip.

Mochila Technique

Is basically Single crochet, but in a slightly different manner….so that we now call it the Modified Single Crochet ..this is used extensively in tapestry crochet and Mochila crochet and helps to define geometric figures especially straight lines.

  1. You crochet only in the back loop
  2. You first crochet Yarn Over(YO) then you have two loops on your hook
  3. Then you crochet Yarn Under(YU) …and pull the yarn through both the loops completing the Modified single crochet stitch.

Significance of the Kanas or Patterns

A Kanas or a pattern in Mochila technique signifies many things…usually it pertains to the woman who is weaving the bag. It could be her perception of her life or the life around her. Certain tribes or villages have their own distinct patterns. So a Kanas is not an arbitrary design. It is well thought out and is a cultural as well as a personal emblem for the Wayuu people. Patterns have different names, including Molokonoutaya, Pulikerüüya, Pasatalo’ouya, Marüliunaya, Antajirasüyaa and many more.

The bags usually carry indigenous drawings or representations of animals and other objects of their cosmology. Each design identifies families, some of the most important are:

the gamako (the frog), the symbol of fertility,

the zikamu (the centipede),

the aku (the rattlesnake),

which symbolizes time and space,

Peynu (the comb),

Kutia (ribs),

Kaku serankua (the creator of the Sierra father),

Makuru (the vulture),

Gwirkunu (the hills and lakes), urumu (the snail),

Sariwuwu (the months of pregnancy),

Kunsamunu a’mia (the thought of women),

Kunsamunu cheyrua (human thought),

Kanzachu (tree leaf),

Chinuzatu (the four corners of the world),

Kambiru (scorpion tail or scribble),

Phundwas (the snowy peaks of the Sierra)

Garwa (the father of the roads).

Types of Kanas or Patterns

Each mochila is different because of its colors, patterns, and thread tension. However, there are certain patterns that have recognized names within the community. Wayuu patterns derive from traditional designs called kaanás (weaving drawing). Kaanás are generally geometric compositions that repeat throughout the making interconnected patterns, each of which receives a name that expresses its meaning.

Do check out the link below….to understand the different type of patterns.

I do hope this post answers your basic queries on Mochila Crochet.


Japanese Flower Motif Coasters

Japanese Flower Motif Coasters



These Motifs were just waiting to be made……And I went for it when A Dear Friend and talented crocheted Amanpreet Sokhi created a CAL for it.


Here is a graph of the Japanese Flower Motif…….





This Graph is slightly different…in the last row.



Here is a Russian blog with a pic tutorial……

Another Blog with a tutorial…


HAve fun doing this one..:-D!!